Philips 288P6 28" 4K Monitor Review
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Philips 288P6 28″ 4K Monitor Review

October 17th, 2014 James Leave a comment Go to comments

Overview

 

With more powerful Graphics Cards like the recently launched Nvidia GTX 980 is it time to really take a look at 4K, or is it still the thing that Gaming dreams are made of? Why not let pcG dip its toe in the 4K water and see what we make of all the fuss. To help us in this quest we will be taking a look at the Philips 288P6 28″ 4K monitor.

The 288P6 is a 16:9 28″ 3840 x 2160 (4K) display with a TFT-LCD panel with LED backlighting. It features a 5ms response time (Gray to Gray) and a Smart Response Time of 1ms (Gray to Gray). It has a height adjustable stand with tilt, pivot (90 degree for portrait mode) and swivel, the monitor also houses x2 3W speakers.

 

Philips 288P6 - box front Philips 288P6 - box details

 

The Philips 288P6 came well packaged in a colourful box, with the information in the top right indicating that this monitor is from Philips’ P-Line. Suggesting that this monitor maybe be more suited to the office than the Gaming room!?

Highlighted on the side of the box we can see various features of the Philips 288P6 (see above right).

 

Philips 288P6 - box open Philips 288P6 - box (panel)

 

Opening the box we can see everything sat in hard polystyrene foam; on the top we have the base, some cables and also some paperwork.

Blow this tray lies the panel itself wrapped in a soft cell bag.

 

Philips 288P6 - cables Philips 288P6 - paperwork

 

The contents of the box (other than the panel and stand) are shown above and listed below (what I find funny is that there’s no cable that supports 4K, according to the Quick Start the DisplayPort cable is optional!). 😮

  • Power Cable (Euro)
  • Dual-link DVI Cable
  • VGA Cable
  • Audio Cable
  • Quick Start
  • Quick Reference Guide (German!)
  • Power Sensor documentation
  • Drivers and Manual CD

At the time of writing the Philips 288P6 28″ 4K Monitor is available for approximately £465 from Ebuyer and comes with a 1 year warranty.

 

Specifications/Features

courtesy of Philips

Philips-288P6-specifications

* Additional details available here

 

First Impressions

 

Once the base and panel was out of the box (and out of the bag) the first job was to marry to the two together. This is about as simple as it comes; as all you have to do is locate the base on the bottom of the stand, ensuring that the small tab of the stand goes through the small hole in the base. Then the two are secured together by a single thumb screw.

 

Philips 288P6 - base (bottom) Philips 288P6 - stand

 

Now with the monitor as a whole it was time to marvel at its beauty!? The Philips 288P6 is a decent looking monitor, but it’s not going to win any design awards that’s for sure. It’s a simple design with a small silver strip at the bottom, highlighting the Philips brand. At least the design is clean and simple and not adorned with buttons and LEDs (always good to see!).

In the bottom right corner you can just see the five touch sensitive buttons (four for the OSD and one power button) as well as a single LED (white) power indicator between the two.

 

Philips 288P6 Philips 288P6 - angled

 

INPUTS & OUTPUTS
 

Philips 288P6 - power
  • Aux Power
  • Left Speaker
  • DVI-D
  • HDMI
  • DisplayPort
  • VGA
  • Audio Out (3.5mm)
  • Audio In (3.5mm)
  • Right Speaker
Philips 288P6 - IO
Philips 288P6 - side (right)
  • USB 2.0
  • USB 2.0
  • USB (Fast Charge)
  • USB 3.0
  • USB 3.0 (input from PC)
  • Main power switch

 

Overall the initial impressions are good, the screen and stand have plenty of adjustment and there’s a host of connection options (although only one supports 4K), including USB and Fast Charge support. But it’s all about that picture really isn’t it, let’s take a look… 😉

 

Testing Methodology/Setup

 

The Philips 288P6 was tested using our Test Rig with a fresh installation of Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit (service pack 1) installed together with all the latest relevant drivers and software. No additional screen calibration software was used, all of the default modes were tested and then the screen was calibrated by hand and eye to the best of my ability.

The test rig uses a MSI R9 290 Gaming 4GB (Boost Clock: 1007MHz / Memory 5000MHz) as its defaulkt card. But considering how much horsepower a 4K screen needs to drive it effectively, I will also be using a new MSI GTX 980 GAMING 4G card also.

During the review I used the following Games to help in the evaluation of the Philips 288P6.

 

 

Hardware Performance

 

I assumed then when I fired up the Philips 288P6 4K for the first time that I would be blown away by the awesome picture that was presented before me! Well, were you James? Well, I guess not, not initially anyway!

Although picture definition and clarity was very high (although that’s kind of expected with over 8 million pixels in front of you!). But brightness levels, contrast levels and overall colour representation was very poor! After downloading and displaying various 4K wallpapers, I decided it was time to delve into the on-screen-menu (OSD). Accessed from the buttons in the bottom left corner of the screen, I found the controls, and menus slow and cumbersome. After trying some of the preset factory settings like (Office, Photo, Movie, Game, Economy etc), I decided that it was time to go it alone. As all of the presets (AFAIK) were terrible.

After some time of messing with controls, fighting with an Adobe sRGB mode and playing with color temps I got to point where I was happy (ish). There’s no doubt that this is no IPS panel and colour representation is not a patch on monitors such as my own Dell U2711. Although that has to be expected due to the TFT-LCD nature of the panel used…

 

Philips 288P6 On

 

Now I could marvel at the picture before me and I have to admit (after a little calibration) the image is impressive, with fantastic detail and a sharp focus. Wallpapers were put to one side a this point as it was now time for Gaming, or at least I tried…

IMPORTANT

(1) Unless you have x2 very powerful GPUs forget 4K, I resorted to a single GTX 980 (overclocked within an inch of its life) and that still wasn’t enough…

(2) I ran into issues with certain GPUs and the Philips 288P6. The end result was flickering at 60Hz, at 30Hz it was fine, but at 60Hz there was a wobble to the image, occasional flicker and sometimes even a loss of picture! This only occurred on our test MSI R9 290 GAMING and my own Personal SLI GTX 780 setup!? I have no idea why, we tried to get to the bottom of it, but…

(3) Assuming you can get running, make sure you’re using a DisplayPort cable and the monitor is set to DisplayPort 1.2, otherwise you will be locked at 30Hz!

 

With all that said what is Gaming like on a the Philips 288P6? The short answer is beautiful but slow…

Most Games returned frame rates of around 30 FPS (not good enough for Gaming!), this made testing tough! What also became apparent in testing is that there was high levels of input lag, I felt that I could almost count the time between a keypresses and the result on-screen!

After weeks of testing with the Philips 288P6 I came to the conclusion that either 4K was not for me, or that the Philips 288P6 was not for me. Picture clarity was awesome, still images awesome, but Gaming suffered. Of course this is not helped by the fact that you really need two modern high powered GPUs for 4K Gaming (FACT!) and for testing we just didn’t have that kind of horsepower. This (of course) is no fault of the Philips 288P6 though and that we must bear in mind…

 

Final Thoughts

 

I have to admit to being a little disappointed by the Philips 288P6 28″ 4K monitor! Is that down to the fact that it requires so much horsepower to drive it, or is it down to the fact that Philips didn’t bring their A game to the table? The answer is a bit of both I think…

The 288P6 is a good looking monitor, but as I have said before it’s not going to win any design awards. It does of course have a plethora of features including, tilt, swivel, and pivot (90 degree for portrait mode). Add to this the USB Hub, Fast Charge port and stereo speakers and we can see the 288P6 is well specified.

Out of the box picture performance was poor, although the image was extremely clear thanks to that 3840×2160 resolution and the associated 8 million plus pixels, colour levels were not so good though. All of the presets didn’t help either, so I manually set about calibrating the monitor to my personal liking. Once done the image was pretty good, but still colour representation was no where near the level of a decent IPS panel.

Gaming was also a mixed bag, not only did we run into issues with flickering on some GPUs (R9 290 & GTX 780), but also we hit the inevitable problem of finding enough horsepower to drive this 4K screen. Even a new Nvidia GTX 980 (heavily overclocked) wasn’t enough to push Games much past 30 FPS! I also felt that there was a fair degree of input lag (even with Smart Response set to Fastest) with the Philips 288P6, a difficult thing to measure but I know I could feel something was wrong.

Overall the Philips P288P6 28″ 4K monitor performed well enough for day to day working, but I’m not sure it’s a Gaming grade monitor…

 

Verdict

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Ebuyer

Philips 288P6LJEB/28W 28″ HD 4K HDMI Monitor



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  Design/Quality pcGameware awards the Philips 288P6 28inch 4K Monitor a Bronze
Performance
Value
Overall

 

Many thanks to Philips for providing this sample for review

 


  1. October 17th, 2014 at 19:13 | #1

    Hi.

    Looks like you are writing about different monitor than Philips 288P6….?

    “I decided it was time to delve into the on-screen-menu (OSD). Accessed from the buttons in the bottom left corner of the screen”
    “I also felt that there was a fair degree of input lag (even with Smart Response set to Fastest) with the Philips 288P6, a difficult thing to measure but I know I could feel something was wrong.”
    “There’s no doubt that this is no IPS panel and colour representation is not a patch on monitors such as my own Dell U2711″

    I am writing this on a Philips 28” 4K LED 288P6LJEB/00 but maybe this is different from your test-sample?

    My buttons are in the lower right corner, Smart Response activated/adjusted and Dell U2711 is “horrible” to look at when compared side by side…

    Just my subjective experience…

    Regards
    Flageborg

  2. James
    October 17th, 2014 at 22:53 | #2

    Oops typo, you’re right the buttons are on the right not left… 😉

  3. October 21st, 2014 at 04:37 | #3

    It would be nice if you could add more photos from various angles.
    How about gaming? Have you tried running fire strike ultra with this?

    • James
      October 21st, 2014 at 08:39 | #4

      I agree more photos would be better, my excuse is that due to the size it’s just so hard to get good photos. I will try harder in the future though… 😉

      No I didn’t test with FireStrike Ultra, but it is something we will look at for other Monitor reviews. Although I’m sure with only one test card (even a GTX 980) it would run like a dog!

  4. November 28th, 2014 at 11:29 | #5

    According to AMD any R9 series card will easily copy with a 4K monitor. In fact seen a few rigs showing 4 monitors powered up by a couple of R9s.

    Your statement need clarification:
    2) I ran into issues with certain GPUs and the Philips 288P6. The end result was flickering at 60Hz, at 30Hz it was fine, but at 60Hz there was a wobble to the image, occasional flicker and sometimes even a loss of picture! This only occurred on our test MSI R9 290 GAMING and my own Personal SLI GTX 780 setup!? I have no idea why, we tried to get to the bottom of it, but…

    What cable type were you using ? HDMI will only support 30fps unless HDMI 2.0

    Display port should be OK unless the actual monitor has a problem, is that what is happening here ??

    I don’t have one of these so cannot pass judgement.

    • James
      November 28th, 2014 at 11:57 | #6

      ‘Easily coping with a 4K monitor’ from AMD is a statement that should obviously be taken with a pinch of salt! What really is the issue with 4K is what you’ll be doing with it. Here at pcG we are a Gaming centric site and we would expect to play games at 60FPS and and at 60Hz as a minimum! None of the current crop of single GPU’s AMD or Nvidia can guarantee that!

      As to the issue with the Philips and flickering, it was only when using DisplayPort 1.2 and 60Hz that I had the problem. I have no idea why it happened, it was intermittent but it was there nonetheless…

      Hope this helps. ATB pcG James

  5. November 28th, 2014 at 14:11 | #7

    Thanks for the feedback. I will looking for a different use for a 4K monitor. Mainly videos etc and photo editing. So I will be looking for an IPS panel monitor. Have you done any testing with Netflix and 4K content ….how would Netflix detect you have a 4K monitor and let you download 4K content ?

    • James
      November 28th, 2014 at 16:54 | #8

      I will look into this and let you know…

  6. November 28th, 2014 at 14:18 | #9

    http://605420.wix.com/beyondhd

    I put up my 4K stuff here